Blüten und Pflanzen im eigenen Garten...


Seite 26 von 28
Neuester Beitrag: 22.08.11 16:54
Eröffnet am: 08.06.08 15:26 von: etküttwieetk. Anzahl Beiträge: 699
Neuester Beitrag: 22.08.11 16:54 von: etküttwieetk. Leser gesamt: 19.427
Forum: Talk   Leser heute: 10
Bewertet mit:
68


 
Seite: < 1 | ... | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 |
| 27 | 28 >  

19607 Postings, 5059 Tage etküttwieetküttnoch ein paar letzte bunte Farbtupfer

 
  
    #626
6
04.10.09 21:28
 
Angehängte Grafik:
mix1.jpg (verkleinert auf 49%) vergrößern
mix1.jpg

13633 Postings, 5260 Tage BoMawirklich bildschön Küttie !

 
  
    #627
5
04.10.09 21:34
Wir hatten auch den ganzen Sommer einen wirklich schönen Bauerngarten, auch Tomaten, Erdbeeren, Kräuter
etc., aber ich muß was tun die nächsten Tage. Unkraut. *kreisch*

Wenn ich fertig bin, gibts Bilder.

:-))

19607 Postings, 5059 Tage etküttwieetküttgute Idee, BoMa

 
  
    #628
2
04.10.09 21:37
es sind doch schon so einige Gärten hier verewigt - find ich klasse!!!  

13633 Postings, 5260 Tage BoMaja..

 
  
    #629
6
04.10.09 21:44
Sogar der manchmal hier doch etwas unromantische rotgrün schlendert im Sommer fasziniert über seine
farbenfrohen "Ländereien"... pflückt hier und da ein Blümchen... beobachtet Schmetterlinge.. pfeift vor sich hin..
wirft Stöckchen für den Hund..

und

IGNORIERT DAS UNKRAUT !!!

*brüll*

33746 Postings, 4199 Tage Harald9kütty #625 - böser Nachbar;

 
  
    #630
3
04.10.09 22:00
schlag ihm doch einen Kupfernagel in seinen Lieblingsbaum  

129861 Postings, 6085 Tage kiiwiiGarten

 
  
    #631
9
05.10.09 01:13
Angehängte Grafik:
garten-1.jpg (verkleinert auf 63%) vergrößern
garten-1.jpg

40521 Postings, 6426 Tage rotgrünArbeitsteilung Garten bei uns morgen

 
  
    #632
7
05.10.09 01:17
Bomi macht das Unkraut weg und ich mache die Bilder. Man das wird wieder anstrengend :-))

129861 Postings, 6085 Tage kiiwiiGarten-2

 
  
    #633
8
05.10.09 01:17
...ganz vorne ein Lavendel...
Angehängte Grafik:
garten-2.jpg (verkleinert auf 63%) vergrößern
garten-2.jpg

884 Postings, 4569 Tage salutkiiwiis Gartenerträge

 
  
    #634
5
05.10.09 01:19

884 Postings, 4569 Tage salutden Giersch kennt er bestimmt

 
  
    #635
05.10.09 01:25

63284 Postings, 6261 Tage Don Rumataja, wer hätte das gedacht, mit etwas Geduld lassen

 
  
    #636
7
08.11.09 19:46
sich selbst in Norddeutschland die Kiwis zur Reife bringen, und echt lecker und absolut Bio!
Angehängte Grafik:
117_kiwi.jpg (verkleinert auf 56%) vergrößern
117_kiwi.jpg

33960 Postings, 4453 Tage McMurphyDon, wieviel Jahre?

 
  
    #637
08.11.09 20:20
Hand auf Herz
;-)

5917 Postings, 4493 Tage Der DonaldistIm Taunus hingegen gibt es nur

 
  
    #638
2
08.11.09 20:21
ziemlich verkümmerte Exemplare.

63284 Postings, 6261 Tage Don Rumatawieviel Jahre?

 
  
    #639
6
08.11.09 20:40
die Pflanze wurde 2004 gepflanzt. Vor 2 Jahren hatten wir schon 3 kleine kiwis, die waren aber nicht so doll. Und in diesem Jahr  war die Blüte normal wie immer im Mai und jetzt wird die Ernte eingefahren...

63284 Postings, 6261 Tage Don Rumataähm, Donald meinen wir das gleiche Früchtchen !?

 
  
    #640
3
08.11.09 20:44

5917 Postings, 4493 Tage Der DonaldistIch denke schon :-))

 
  
    #641
1
08.11.09 20:47

5917 Postings, 4493 Tage Der Donaldist@Don Hier bekommst du deine Kiwis los

 
  
    #642
1
12.11.09 11:09

 

Bring your own fruit and vegetables

At some restaurants and pubs around the country you can exchange your homegrown produce for a drink

     
 
 
Laurie Gear  

Chef Laurie Gear at the Artichoke restaurant in Amersham, with homegrown produce brought in by a cusomer. Photograph: Frank Baron

What can you get for a handful of knobbly potatoes and a few mutant baby tomatoes? These are the last remnants of our vegetable patch. They might not look like much but they have been grown with love by my husband, who has parted with them under duress. I am taking them to barter at Artichoke, a restaurant in Amersham, Buckinghamshire where chef Laurie Gear encourages locals to bring in their beautiful produce in return for a free glass of wine, and the privilege of seeing their vegetables transformed into cutting-edge cuisine (which is not free).

On arrival, I quickly realise I'm way out of my league. Gear's regulars hand over prizeworthy pumpkins, squashes, wild garlic, curly kale, rosemary and mint. One even donates game from the local shoot: "His wife does not like to cook pheasant," explains Gear, frowning at my paltry haul.

"There has to be traceability," he says, looking at me doubtfully, "I wouldn't accept something if I didn't know the person." Barter is clearly a tricky, subjective business. But in these recessional times it is becoming something of a trend. Earlier this year a Norfolk pub, The Pigs, in Edgefield near Holt in Norfolk, announced it was offering pints in return for locally sourced food to serve. It also welcomes game, pigeons and crayfish. And The Old Stag Inn in Llangernyw, Conwy, north Wales, will also accept customers' homegrown produce at the bar.

At The Marksman Pub in Shoreditch, east London, you can "barter for a starter" with goods or services. Its website carries a list of desired items ranging from allotment produce, fresh-cut lilies or a bag of coffee beans to a Phillips screwdriver set. The pub also needs to get its piano tuned and the windows cleaned. "See if you can get a beer out of us," writes landlady Dawn Kolper, "but please remember that this is not an 'everybody wins' type of game. We have been known to refuse offers."

Evidently, they don't take any old rubbish at Artichoke either. The three-course a la carte menu here costs £38. And critics love the place ("Every mouthful is a joy," says Fay Maschler. "A smart outfit," says Jay Rayner).

This week Kim Rowland, a full-time mum, brought in a bucket of jerusalem artichokes from her allotment. "We just ask them if they want any because there's only so much you can eat. We've given runner beans, turnips, lettuces and cucumbers too."

This week's contribution goes straight into one of Gear's signature dishes: jerusalem artichoke mousse with hazelnut sponge, brown butter sorbet and toasted hazelnuts. Another customer's apples have just gone into the chutney to accompany a game pie. And the pumpkins were transformed into a pumpkin creme brulee with fennel. Rowland's beetroot once even headlined the tasting menu as a sorbet (with goat's cheese, lemon thyme and rye bread).

Gear says there's no real financial benefit from using donated produce. "It's just something we can do because we're a local, neighbourhood restaurant," he explains.

As for the customers, says Rowland: "We just get a lot of pleasure out of growing stuff and it's a shame to see it not used up."

The informal bartering started some years ago when one regular had a glut of vegetables. But since the restaurant reopened this year after a fire, Gear has become even more passionate about using local produce. During the enforced sabbatical caused by the fire, he visited Noma in Copenhagen (recently ranked as third-best restaurant in the world), where the sous-chef is also a forager and the ethos is about getting the flavour of the local land into the dishes. "It's not about being clever for clever's sake," he says, "That's just peeing in the wind. It's about wanting to do something a bit different." Gear grew up on a council estate in Lyme Regis, Dorset, and foraged for hazelnuts with his father as a child. He first made elderflower champagne at the age of 13. Next spring he plans to take his whole cooking team foraging for wild sorrel, mushrooms, elderberries and cobnuts.

So what do I get for my meagre handful of produce? A cup of coffee and a look of pity. But here, the barter is not so much about what you get in return. It's about the thrill of seeing your produce in the hands of someone with a Michelin star in their sights. As I'm leaving, Gear gives my potatoes a second look. "Maybe I can take those off your hands." I blush with pride.

 

63284 Postings, 6261 Tage Don Rumataich kann's noch nicht so recht glauben

 
  
    #643
11
25.11.09 20:09
...aber die ernte ist eingebracht! Zwei eimer und das hier im hohen norden... und lecker!
Wird wohl nicht mal für marmelade reichen, da sie vorher schon weg sind.
Angehängte Grafik:
118_kiwi_ernte.jpg (verkleinert auf 56%) vergrößern
118_kiwi_ernte.jpg

33960 Postings, 4453 Tage McMurphyDas ist eine Sensation

 
  
    #644
6
25.11.09 20:12
Glückwunsch

19607 Postings, 5059 Tage etküttwieetküttklasse Don! Lasst sie Euch schmecken!

 
  
    #645
5
25.11.09 20:14

63284 Postings, 6261 Tage Don Rumatana na. lieber herr möhrfie, bitte nicht ganz

 
  
    #646
2
07.12.09 19:26
so sarkastisch! Wir hier oben in niedersachsen leben doch fast am polarkreis bzw. haben wir hier schon heute die temperaturen, die der polarkreis morgen haben wird! Ja, wir sind nah dran!

:-)

33960 Postings, 4453 Tage McMurphyund ich habs wirklich einmal ernst gemeint

 
  
    #647
2
08.12.09 06:11

38 Postings, 6724 Tage tutti7 Jahre

 
  
    #648
5
08.12.09 07:26
Ich kann es kaum glauben
Habe vor 7 Jahren eine Kiwipflanze gesetzt. Konnte noch überhaupt nichts ernten.
Letztes Jahr waren 2 Blüten zu erkennen, aber der Hagel hat dann alles zerstört.
Da braucht man glaube ich sehr sehr viel Geduld.
Grüsse
Tutti  

33960 Postings, 4453 Tage McMurphyBlüten hatten wir immer viele, aber nie

 
  
    #649
3
08.12.09 16:21
Früchte. Dafür Wurzeln wie beim Bambus.

3168 Postings, 4803 Tage CharlyBrown17.12.

 
  
    #650
8
17.12.09 16:16
 
Angehängte Grafik:
schneerose.jpg (verkleinert auf 69%) vergrößern
schneerose.jpg

Seite: < 1 | ... | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 |
| 27 | 28 >  
   Antwort einfügen - nach oben